Mitsuyado Sei-men | McKinley Hill

This is the 3rd and newest branch of Mitsuyado Sei-men, they have one in Bluebay Walk, Macapagal Ave and the other branch is located in Jupiter St. Belair, Makati City. This restaurant was brought to Manila by the UCC group and started the “dipping noodle” innovation back in 2012.

Mitsuyado Sei-men | McKinley Hill

So what does “Tsukemen” means? It means “dipping noodles” and cold noodles are served separately with hot dipping soup and toppings on the side. The soup serves as a dipping sauce and is typically much stronger and intense in flavor compared to standard ramen broth.

Oohhh hot *wink

You have a choice if you want cold or hot noodles for your Tsukemen. Aside from the Tsukemen, they also have the regular ramen meals, choose between Chicken or Pork soup base ramen.

Pour some cheese please. Cheese Sauce Tsukemen - small 200g (Php 330).

Pour some cheese please. Cheese Sauce Tsukemen – small 200g (Php 330).

 

Mitsuyado Sei-men opened in Mckinley last February 26. It is located on the ground floor with a view of the grand canal and few steps away from the “selfie bridge”. Upon seeing the menu, I was overwhelmed because there’s a lot to choose from. We tried Cheese Sauce Tsukemen, Marutoku Tsukemen and of course, gyoza. I didn’t notice that they have set menu, all for Php 320 which I will try on my next visit.

Marutoku Tsukemen is served with Aji-tama (Japanese egg), Nori and Pork Tonkutsu broth.

Marutoku Tsukemen is served with Aji-tama (Japanese egg), Nori and Pork Tonkutsu broth.

 

So what’s the difference between Ramen and Tsukemen? Tsukemen is called “dipping ramen.” Rather than being served together in a big bowl like ramen is, tsukemen is served with two plates. One bowl holds the noodles while the other holds the broth. Tsukemen are for those people who loves ramen even on hot, summer days. Tsukemen is being served with a cold noodle separated from the sauce. The way to eat tsukemen is just take an ample amount of noodle, dip it in the sauce, cheese for example, then dip in the bowl of ramen broth.

Crowded with Japanese goodness.

Crowded with Japanese goodness.

 

Japanese dining is not complete without gyoza on the side. The taste of the gyoza is nothing extraordinary but it is still good. Other side dishes you can order, an 8 pieces plate of wanton, potato fries etc. Check the menu here.

All hail to this steamed gyoza (Php 180).

All hail to this steamed gyoza (Php 180).

 

Mitsuyado Seimen is located at the ground floor of Venice Grand Canal mall and on the right side near Bench shop.

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